5 Awesome Examples of Creative Electronic Drum Sets and Hybrid Kits

drummer-inspiration

Today I’m dedicating a post to have a look at some awesome drummers that are using hybrid and electronic setups.

These setups are all about being inventful and experimenting. They are using more than just stock electronic drum sets. You will also notice that ‘less is more’ for some of these, and it shows that a really minimal setup can actually make you look even more epic. Therefore, you don’t need a massive budget to build one of these type of sets yourself.

On the other hand, the first two drummers on this list really go all out with their epic sets.

You don’t have to be a DJ or producer to use hybrid style set ups. However, it’s pretty common for drummers to start producing their own music once they start getting in depth into these.

Some of the drummers on this list are famous, while others are steadily gaining their following.

KJ Sawka

KJ Sawka, is the drummer from the bands Pendulum and Destroid. Look at this fantastic kit set up. He uses a combination of triggered heads and acoustic sounds.

If you look closely, you’ll see the triggers attached to the rims of each of the drums, and an electronic drum trigger module at the bottom left of the video. From the looks of it, he’s using Roland’s newest triggering technology, and they sound fantastic.

He’s even using some pitch automation on at least one of the e-drums too. Very inventive and interesting.

He’s a heavy user of Ableton Live, and has even created sample packs directly for use in that DAW.

Also, he’s a great drummer.

AFISHAL

Now for something completely different. AFISHAL is a drummer/DJ that has a massive following online. He uses his own fantastic electronic drum pad and light show setup. The pads are used as triggers to Ableton live on his laptop, which he uses to create a live drumming/DJ combo.

This is definitely the most inventive looking setup out of this list. This would be an incredibly fun kit to play on!

Brennan Benko

Listen to the tasty sound of this. With fantastically processed samples, he uses a kick trigger with a really punchy club 808 sound. Another user of the Roland SPD-SX, I think you’ll notice that’s a very common thing amongst great hybrid setups.

Great acoustic and electronic combinations here. Notice the microphone placement, and the tasty sound he’s getting from the rim shots. He’s still decided to go with the presence of an acoustic kick drum. Why wouldn’t he, it sounds amazing.

Caleb Breaux

Another very cool player of hybrid drum setups, Caleb is a drummer/producer that uses a very nice combination of gear as a drummer/producer.

He has put together a bunch of cool videos that you can check out on his Instagram. He often uses a small amount of drum pads, hats, and a Roland SPD-SX. He’s also a big fan of the fantastic Roland 404, a great old sampler that’s still as relevant as when it first came out.

It’s easy for drummers to feel like they’re stuck in the background, Caleb is a perfect example of someone that’s being in the limelight while also having a great time on his kit!

Camellia Akhamie Kies

Camellia Akhamie Kies is a professional drummer and DJ with a US military veteran background and big resume in music education. Originally born in the German City of Heidelberg (go there, visit the castle, it’s lovely… but hey, this isn’t a travel blog).

Camellia’s setups vary a lot depending on the context. In this example, she uses the powerful percussion pad capabilities of the Roland Octapad along with the sampling power of the Roland SPD-SX, a dream combination for those that have the budget!

She blends electronic pads, with acoustic drums, and percussion instruments. She also sometimes replaces her kick drum with a cajon (very useful for portability).

Conclusion

It’s easy to get lost in the standard formats of electronic drum sets, but some really amazing stuff can come out if you’re willing to experiment a bit and be creative.

After all, music is about expression, creativity, and performance.

You can start off small, such as using a few pads. Later on, you can really build on your knowledge, process effects and samples, use MIDI, triggers, etc!

I hope you’re feeling inspired! Do you have some other cool examples of electronic and hybrid drum setups? I’d love to hear about them, and I’ll likely feature them in part 2 of this post.

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