The 5 Best Practice Drum Sets (2021)

Practicing drums is not as easy as most other instruments. If you can’t practice drums due to noise or space constraints, here are some great options to consider.

There are several different ways you can get to practice drumming in a quiet way. Even though practice drum sets are not the same as full drum sets, it’s extremely important to put in the work every day to improve your drumming skills.

The 5 Best Practice Drum Sets (2021)

1. Drum Workshop Go Anywhere 5-Piece Set Practice Pad
Our Top Pick - 5-piece practice drum pads kit with a collapsible stand - great for everyday practice at home
2. Alesis Nitro Mesh Kit
A very decent entry-level kit which is great for practicing
3. Vic Firth Drum Mute Prepack
Pack of eight drumheads and cymbals mutes - A cost effective option
4. Slint Drum Practice Pad & Snare Stand Bundle
Two-sided practice pad and snare stand
5. Donner Drum Practice Pad
Another good quality practice pad and snare stand bundle

Let’s look at these practice drum sets in more detail.

1. Drum Workshop Go Anywhere 5-Piece Set Practice Pad

Our Pick as the Best Drum Practice Kit
This is purpose-built as a quiet and compact practice set.
View Price at SweetwaterView Price at Amazon

If you can’t play a full drum set due to noise constraints, this practice pad set is the perfect pick. With it, you get a set of 5 practice pads, two 8” and two 10” pads, which fit for snare, floor tom, rack tom, and cymbal, and a fifth tower pad for kick drums.

It also comes with a stand on which you can easily set up everything, and sit on it as if you were sitting in front of real drums.

Pros

  • Five drum pads
  • Nicely compact when fully set up
  • Easily foldable and travel-ready
  • Very quiet

Cons

  • No drum pedal included

This set is easily foldable and has a very low footprint, making it a perfect fit for smaller rooms and apartments. It will also travel very well. The pads give out a nice feel—even though they are not premium quality, they will still give you the rebound you want.

This is a nice, mid-range priced, quality made item for practicing at home when you don’t have space for a full drum set.

2. Alesis Nitro Mesh Kit

A Great E-Drum Set for Practicing
A very decent entry-level kit which is great for practicing
View Price at SweetwaterView Price at Amazon

If noise is your main problem for practicing drums at home, getting a set of electronic drums is a very handy solution. Even entry-level electronic drum sets have improved a lot over the last few years.

Pros

  • Very decent drum module with 358 different sounds
  • Includes mesh heads
  • Can be used with headphones or a drum amp (needs to be purchased separately)

Cons

  • Requires power!

The Alesis Nitro Mesh Kit is a very decent beginner’s e-drums set. It comes with a dual-zone, 8” snare and three 8” toms, kick tower, and three 10” cymbals. The pads are covered in mesh material, which gives a much better feel and rebound in comparison to rubber pads.

The module on this set accommodates 385 sounds, with 25 preset kits you can choose from and 60 songs to learn the drums to.

You can also use ¼” outputs and inputs to connect a CD player or a computer to get the sound on, use headphones, or reprogram the whole kit with a MIDI connection through your computer.

3. Vic Firth Drum Mute Prepack

Great for Making Your Drum Set Quieter for Practice
A very cost-effective way to practice without breaking the bank
View Price at Amazon

If you already have an acoustic drum set but want to tone down the noise, you can always use drum mutes. These are simple pieces of material that you put over your drums, and they muffle the noise.

They won’t turn off the noise completely, but they may decrease the volume enough for your needs.

Pros

  • Very affordable
  • Useful if you already have an acoustic drum set
  • Small and easy to handle

Cons

  • You have to own an acoustic drum kit for this to work.
  • They won’t turn down the volume completely.
  • You don’t get much rebound when playing these, so they’re not as fun to play as an unmuffled drum set.

This Vic Firth Prepack comes with 12”, 13”, 14”, 16”, 22”, hi-hat and two cymbal mutes. This should cover your standard drum kit. You can also cut these to fit your drums if the sizes don’t fit you or you have smaller drums than usual.

You can stack two of these to get a quieter, softer sound and playing style as well. This is by far the cheapest solution for people who already own a drum kit and want to play on it at home.

4. Slint Drum Practice Pad & Snare Stand Bundle

Everything you Need to Practice Your Rudiments and Sticking
Two-sided practice pad and snare stand
View Price at Amazon

A drum practice pad is an absolutely essential item for any drummer. This practice pad bundle is a good buy for any drummer.

This practice pad is 12” and is made out of wood which has two different sides. Both are made out of rubber with one offering a realistic acoustic drum rebound, while the other is a bit softer and gives less rebound when played.

Pros

  • Affordable buy for beginners
  • Two-sided pad with options for different playing styles
  • Includes a stand, drumsticks, and bags

Cons

  • Only one pad
  • The drumsticks are not great (though high quality sticks are pretty affordable to buy separately)

With the pad, you will get a snare drum stand, a bag, and a set of drumsticks. The stand is collapsible and can be used for real snare drums as well.

5. Donner Drum Practice Pad

Another Good Quality Snare Stand Bundle
View Price at Amazon

To finish off this list, I present to you the Donner Drum Practice Pad Kit. This is a similar item to the previous one. You get one 12” pad, which is equipped on both sides with EVA polymer surface, with one side softer from the other.

Pros

  • Comes with three sets of drumsticks
  • Comes with all of the essential accessories

Cons

  • Only one pad
  • The drumsticks are not amazing.

In the kit, you will get a stand that will fit the practice pad (as well as drums measured anywhere from 10” to 14”). This also includes three sets of drumsticks and bags to accommodate everything easily.

Quiet Acoustic Kits

Sometimes, quiet playing is everything you need. Many drummers still prefer to practice on their own regular drum set and the only potential issue is noise. Drummers have traditionally used various kinds of muffling techniques to mute their drums.

Improvised ways of silencing acoustic drums can be effective, but they can greatly reduce the experience of playing the drum set. In most cases, muted drumheads sound quite uninspiring and could alienate many drummers from their daily practice routines.

Fortunately, methods for reducing the sound of acoustic kits are getting much better these days. For example, you can replace the heads on your drums with Silent Stroke drumheads, which are REALLY quiet.

The same goes for cymbals. Low-volume cymbals are practically nothing more than perforated cymbals, though some manufacturers also use special kinds of coating. In any case, you can count on a significantly lower pitch and shorter sustain. These are significantly quieter than regular cymbals.

Check out our article on silent stroke drum heads and low volume cymbals to learn more.

Soundproofing Your Room for Drum Practice

If noise is the only thing bothering you, you may consider soundproofing your practice room. These days, you can successfully insulate your room without spending thousands of dollars.

You can use affordable materials that are common in the construction industry, such as weatherstrip tapes, which are perfect to insulate your doors and windows. Also, consider fiberglass curtains and panels to insulate doors, as well as soundproof curtains which are a very convenient solution for windows.

Finally, there are a whole bunch of different materials that can be used to insulate walls. You can go for familiar acoustic foams, which are used in studios.

On the other side, you can also try different kinds of materials that are frequently used in the construction industry. Some are cheaper, while others are more efficient. In any case, it definitely won’t cost you a fortune.

If you are interested in soundproofing your practice room, check our “How to Soundproof Your Drum Room” article, where you can find lots of tips and advice on this subject.

Summary

I hope this article has helped you learn about easy and good ways to practice drums when you are at home or you don’t have space for a full drum kit. Whether you’re an experienced drummer or a complete beginner, it’s essential to keep up with the daily practice as that is the only way you can improve yourself and your playing style.

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